What to do with grass clippings

grass clippings

Grass clippings can be used as mulch. Grass clippings left to decompose on the soil surface improve soil structure and add organic matter to the soil. This lawn care practice is often referred to as grasscycling or simply recycling. It is the practice of leaving grass clippings on the lawn when you mow.

Lawn clippings

Grasscycling is an important part of lawn care. Grass that is left on the lawn following a mowing, decomposes and adds nutrients that your lawn needs to stay green, healthy, thick, and lush. It also saves you money by reducing the amount of fertilizer you need to apply each year. Lawn grass clippings are not considered organic matter but rather as yard waste or even refuse which doesn’t need to be composted before adding it to landfills.


Aerating the soil with a core aerator leaves air pockets for water, roots, and oxygen to go into. Aeration opens up compacted soil allowing better circulation of nutrients throughout the entire lawn area. This process also water moisture to soak all the way down to the roots rather than being repelled by compacted soil.


It also helps give the lawn a great, healthy dark green color and allows the grass to weed out. Grass clippings will block sunlight from reaching the blades of your lawn if left on top of your lawn after mowing. Grass that is cut too short for its growing stage may not recover as quickly or as tall as it would have if you had let it grow naturally to the proper height for its growth stage.

Grass clippings

Some people believe that grass clippings make a perfect fertilizer, but this idea can be dangerous for those who are trying to grow their own food in their yard. Grass clippings generally do not contain enough nitrogen or phosphorus to be beneficial to plants and if not composted before adding it to your garden, can cause problems.

Composting grass clippings

When it comes to compost, use 1/3 brown material for every 2/3 green material. This will create the right balance of air and moisture needed for decomposition to take place. If your pile is too wet, make sure you mix some dry leaves or shredded paper with it to allow more airflow. If your pile is too dry, then add more moist material such as kitchen scraps or even some grass clippings.


You can also keep a separate compost bin for just grass clippings and use these materials to build a foundation of several inches of nitrogen-rich material before adding other organic waste to it. Although not all types of grass are suitable for use in compost, many non-native and native grasses can be used to improve your garden soil. The grass is a great source of nitrogen because it takes this nutrient from the air and puts it into the roots where other plants can take advantage of it.

Compost pile

Composting helps speed up the decomposition of materials by using natural bacteria which thrive in moist conditions that are near 70 degrees Fahrenheit, and a little higher or lower. The heat generated by these bacteria will kill any weed seeds and plant diseases that were present in the original grass clippings, speeding up the composting process. This is why you should avoid placing newly cut grass into your compost pile.

Composting grass clippings with other materials such as dead leaves and twigs not only helps speed up the process of decomposition but also adds vital carbon needed to help balance out the finished product making a more effective compost. Nitrogen is an important component of organic matter that makes up about 11 percent of grass clippings, so mixing them with materials high in carbon helps maintain an optimum balance. Be careful if adding diseased or infested grass clippings into your compost pile.

Many harmful diseases and pests can survive the high temperatures of a well-managed compost pile. A good rule to follow is if you wouldn’t eat it, don’t put it in your compost pile. There are many ways to go about recycling grass clippings on your lawn.

You can sprinkle them around flower beds or lightly rake them into existing mulch which will allow enough decomposition to benefit soil fertility without giving up an excessive amount of nitrogen from the decomposing clippings. If you have a small garden then just mow over the lawn right before you plant new flowers or vegetables since cutting at this time will not affect future growth as much as clipping would during other times in the growing year. You can also use a mulching mower which is designed to chop and disperse clippings evenly into the lawn for maximum benefit.

This type of grass catcher will keep your clippings together and allow you to remove them from the lawn as one full unit instead of having them scattered all over like traditional grass bags.

Compost grass clippings separately from your other lawn clippings and garden waste.

Grass clipping recycling is an important concept to understand for those who are looking for ways to improve their garden. Keeping the nitrogen levels balanced in your compost pile will allow you to have rich, dark soil that will help reduce water usage by keeping the roots of your plants well-watered. Additionally, grass clippings also act as a great weed barrier if not applied too thickly to walkways or areas where you don’t want weeds growing.

If done correctly, grass clipping recycling can be one of the best things that you do for both your yard and garden!

Recycling grass clippings

Grass clipping recycling is an important concept to understand for those who are looking for ways to improve their garden. Keeping the nitrogen levels balanced in your compost pile will allow you to have rich, dark soil that will help reduce water usage by keeping the roots of your plants well-watered. Additionally, grass clippings also act as a great weed barrier if not applied too thickly to walkways or areas where you don’t want weeds growing.

If done correctly, grass clipping recycling can be one of the best things that you do for both your yard and garden! Recycling grass clippings can be beneficial in several ways to both your yard and garden. However, if done improperly it can be detrimental to the health of your plants.

Grass clipping recycling should not be one of the first things you think about when managing your garden; make sure you have enough time to dedicate to this task before starting. A common mistake for beginners is adding too many grass clippings at once since this will cause your compost pile to become anaerobic (the decomposition process is not occurring efficiently). Ideally, you want the ratio of carbon (grass clippings) to nitrogen (kitchen scraps, leaves, plants) in your compost pile to be approximately 25-30 parts carbon to 1 part nitrogen.

Make sure you keep adding grass clippings as your pile breaks down and becomes more balanced. Add around four inches of material every few weeks so the process doesn’t become overwhelming.

Remove grass clippings from your lawn

This will decrease the amount of clipping you put in your compost pile and allow more room for other, non-grass-related items. Make sure to never include diseased plants or parts of plants since this can prevent your composting efforts from being successful. If you want to avoid grass clipping recycling completely, you can simply wait for your clippings to decompose in the lawn or mow more often.

It is important to do grass clipping recycling correctly because leaving too many clippings on the ground will cause them to mat down and restrict water absorption by your plants’ roots. This could potentially kill your plants if their water intake is decreased by too much. If you don’t want to compost your grass clippings, then consider using them as mulch in place of the standard black or gold material used around flowers and bushes.

This can also help prevent weeds from growing, leaving more room for your garden’s natural beauty to shine through!

Leave grass clippings on your lawn

If you decide not to compost your grass clippings, then consider using them as mulch in place of the standard black or gold material used around flowers and bushes. This can also help prevent weeds from growing, leaving more room for your garden’s natural beauty to shine through!

Bagged grass clippings

Bagged grass clippings are not appropriate for compost piles because there is no room for air to circulate through the blades of grass and allow decomposing bacteria to flourish. If you have a lot of bagged clippings then make sure to thoroughly mix them with other, more suitable composting materials such as yard waste or kitchen scraps. Bagged grass clippings can also be used as a mulch around your plants, however, make sure the bags are not directly touching any plants or vegetables since you do not want the disease to spread from the grass to your plants.

Wet grass clippings

Soggy grass clippings are not good for compost because they will rot into a slimy substance that can kill bacteria needed for decomposition. This material should be either thrown out or used as mulch if you want to avoid diseased plants due to the potential transfer of pathogens from the grass clippings.

Dry grass clippings

If you decide to compost your grass clippings, make sure they are dry and brown. The green color of the grass blade is a sign that nutrients have not yet been sent down into the roots and will rot if it sits too long in wet, decomposing conditions. To avoid this, mix wet and dry grass clippings together to supply the right amount of moisture and air needed for decomposition. If you leave your grass clippings in a pile after they have dried, then you will get better results than if you were to just lay them on top of the ground.

Dirty/Sharp grass clippings

Grass that is dirty or contains too many prickly stems can be difficult to break down and turn into compost. Make sure the grass clippings are dry before you put them through a compost pile. If they have been sitting out in rain or have been watered, then lay the grass blades in the sun so they can dry up before being added to your pile.

Bag clippings

Although you will still have to pick up grass clippings on your lawn clippings, you can use this leaves as an excellent fertilizer for your garden. The clippings will provide many of the same benefits they would if added directly to a compost pile but will not introduce weed seeds or plant diseases that could harm your plants.

By adding just two pounds of grass clippings per 100 square feet of garden area, you increase the nitrogen content by about one pound.

If you do this every time you mow then all your gardening needs are met through recycling at no cost to the environment. Grass clippings should be disposed of carefully in order to not make any more problems than they may already be. If grass clippings are not collected in a bag or mulched they can be blown by the wind and create unsightly brown spots in your lawn.

If you want to make sure they do not obstruct your lawn, place them atop soil that is already high in nitrogen (most often found near trees) then water until soaked into the soil. Keep mower blades sharpened for best results when shredding grass clippings. A dull blade will force you to cut more frequently since it struggles with tough material like thick roots.

This means that you will end up collecting even more of this potentially helpful leavings than if you had just taken the time to sharpen the blades before every use.

grass clippings it, and a little higher or lower. The heat generated by these bacteria will kill any weed seeds and plant diseases that were present in the original grass clippings, speeding up the composting process.

This is why you should avoid placing newly cut grass into your compost pile. Composting grass clippings with other materials such as dead leaves and twigs not only helps speed up the process of decomposition but also adds vital carbon needed to help balance out the finished product making a more effective compost. Nitrogen is an important component of organic matter that makes up about 11 percent of grass clippings, so mixing them with materials high in carbon helps maintain an optimum balance.

Be careful if adding diseased or infested grass clippings to your compost pile. Although the decomposers will kill any harmful pathogens, you can give rise to new diseases if applying infected material to any part of your garden. If you are not sure whether or not the original grass clipping is safe then place it in a separate compost pile away from any plants that may be eaten by humans or animals.

Long clippings

Maybe too tough to break down can also be used as a mulch around plants and bushes. The longer pieces will decompose much slower than the rest of the grass clippings and prevent disease and pests from entering your yard while improving the overall aesthetics of your garden bed. If you decide to go this route, make sure that all plant material is removed before use.

Grass clippings collected in a bag for composting

The best time to collect your grass clippings is when the mowing season begins in springtime. This makes it easier for them to break down since they are fresh and actively growing over the summer months when temperatures are warmer. Also keeping track of how often you cut certain areas helps you determine how big of a pile to make and how frequently you will need to add grass clippings from the mower.

grass clippings can be recycled in many different ways. They can be left on the surface of a lawn, used as mulch around bushes, or added directly to your compost pile which can later be applied to where it is needed throughout your yard. Make sure not to apply too much at once since nitrogen has a tendency to destabilize soil chemistry making nutrients unavailable to plants.

Using grass clippings as a natural fertilizer for your garden makes recycling them into a resource that benefits both your yard and the environment!